Case Studies

ARCHS' Archived Case Studies and Results (1997-Present)

ARCHS' Federally Funded Programming

ARCHS' CARES

Community Action Reentry Employment System for Greater St. Louis

  • Funder: U.S. Department of Labor
  • Award Amount: $1.9 million (2007)
  • Topic: Prisoner reentry job training and placement

Summary:

  • ARCHS’ CARES assisted St. Louis bi-state region’s paroled prisoners in job skill development, job placement, job retention, increased earnings, and reduced recidivism.  15 partners completed activities on time from July 1, 2007 thru June 30, 2008.
  • The U.S. Department of Labor extended the project until September 30, 2008 to wrap-up remaining partner activities.  Coordinated database systems tracked participants’ case management notes, employment history, wages, and barriers.
  • More than 650 federal and state ex-offenders served (exceeding goal of 480). 350 job placements secured with an annual payroll valued at more than $5.6 million.  Key outcomes presented at national and state conferences, and in U.S. Congressional testimony.

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ARCHS' WANTO

Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations for Greater St. Louis

  • Funder: U.S. Department of Labor
  • Award Amount: $350,000 (2003)
  • Topic: Female prisoner reentry job training and placement in non-traditional occupations

Summary:

  • ARCHS’ WANTO assisted women being released from prison to achieve and maintain employment in apprenticeships and nontraditional occupations. Pre-release services were coordinated with Greenville Federal Prison in Illinois to give women the tools they needed to enter a range of industries, e.g., construction, cabinetmaking, and computer maintenance.
  • ARCHS provided technical assistance, training, and support to participating employers and labor unions to prepare them to recruit and retain these women.  Also, ARCHS provided case management, mentors, job coaches, and other support services to ensure that the women were able to overcome obstacles associated with acclimating to work.
  • Once a reasonable level of stability was attained, 75 of 100 eligible women were placed in entry-level employment for nontraditional occupations.  And after successful completion of pre-apprenticeship training, more than 200 women were placed in apprenticeships.   All women participating in ARCHS’ project were tracked over time in order to support their establishing a successful recent work history.

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ARCHS' RXMEDS

Regional eXcess Medication Disposal Service

  • Funder: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Award Amount: $150,570 (2007)
  • Topic: Safe and "green" disposal of medications

Summary:

  • ARCHS’ RxMEDS developed a pilot national demonstration in the St. Louis bi-state region to inventory and prudently dispose of unwanted medications.  The project was managed successfully, including substantive research and highly-regulated activities at 20 sites in four counties across two states.
  • 39 community partners and senior service agencies were utilized.  Documented demographics of 892 participants, type and amount of 296,650 medication doses returned.  Documented results of educational outreach program to 3,331 seniors and 387 elementary school students and 15 teachers.
  • Won two national awards.  Key outcomes presented at four national conferences and replicated throughout the nation and internationally.
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ARCHS' SLACAT

St. Louis Area Communities Against Toxics

  • Funder: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Award Amount: $100,000 (2007)
  • Topic: Promotion of safe disposal of household hazardous waste and "green" focused lifestyles in urban settings

Summary:

  • ARCHS’ SLACAT involved environmental justice community in collaborative problem solving for improved solid and toxic waste management.  The three-year project was managed successfully via a logic model evaluation process.
  • Collected baseline data, engaged more than 250 urban core residents and small businesses, collected 8.3 tons of hazardous waste (tripled goal of 50% increase over baseline)
  • Distributed more than 3,000 "go green" multi-media toolkits to the community.  And reached consensus on future community-based environmental strategies. Key outcomes presented at four national conferences, including a video short featured at a public health conference's film festival.
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ARCHS' CATEE

Community Access to Environmental Education for Greater St. Louis

  • Funders: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Missouri Department of Social Services, Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri American Water, St. Louis-Jefferson Waste Management District, The Saigh Foundation
  • Award Amount: $258,275 (2003-2007)
  • Topic: Environmental education in the St. Louis Public Schools

Summary:

  • Trained public school educators in environmental teaching strategies and improved students’ skills and concepts in science.  Emphasis on “Natural Intelligence” best practices for multiple intelligences teaching/learning.  Partnership engaged students and teachers with minority community groups to develop and implement strategies for addressing neighborhood solid waste and water quality issues.
  • Documented student and teacher participation, attendance, test scores, community meetings, pounds of waste collected, etc. through monthly and quarterly progress reports and final report.  100% of the teachers were trained and 75% of project goals were exceeded.  Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) student science scores increased by 6.4%. ARCHS’ Project Manager received the U.S. EPA Region 7 award as Missouri’s Environmental Educator of the Year.

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ARCHS' SECOND CHANCE ACT MENTORING PARTNERSHIP

  • Funder: U.S. Department of Justice
  • Award Amount: $265,944 (FY09-FY11)
  • Topic: Prisoner mentoring and reentry services, pre and post release

Summary:

  • ARCHS was the only organization in Missouri to be awarded first round "Second Chance Act" funding from U.S. Dept. of Justice.
  • ARCHS partnered with Missouri Dept. of Corrections to implement the innovative mentoring program in three state prisons (located in Pacific, Vandalia, and Farmington). During the two-year program, 258 ex-offenders were served. The vast majority (98%) of these ex-offenders served by ARCHS' mentoring program did not recidivate, with only 2.4% having returned to prison. The program's impact achieved impressive results, compared with the national and state average recidivism rate of more than 35% returning to prison.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE OR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: 1) ARCHS Helping Make Changes Through a Pen & Pad (article). 2) ARCHS Reentry Partnership Paving a New Life Path for Ex-Offenders (article). 3) ARCHS Helping Offenders Make Life Changes (article). 4) Making Changes from Within the Walls (article).

ARCHS' GANG RESISTANCE EDUCATION AND TRAINING (GREAT)

  • Funder: U.S. Department of Justice
  • Award Amount: $89,000 (FY09-FY12)
  • Topic: Provide life skills and mentoring program to underserved students

Summary:

  • ARCHS collaborated with area police agencies and school districts to meet all milestones and performance measures in implementing a national gang prevention program for elementary and middle school students from the urban core of St. Louis.
  • Uniformed police officers, trained by GREAT in the national curriculum, taught the weekly lessons during the school day for students and their classroom teachers, and taught the families component during the summer for select students and their parents.
  • More than 4,300 at-risk students were served by two U.S. DOJ grants since FY06
  • The vast majority of surveyed students and parents agreed that GREAT graduates increased their positive attitudes about anti-gang, law enforcement, conflict management, and decision making.
  • Additional survey results showed that 100% of police officers agreed that they themselves learned new information about gang prevention in the professional development trainings and would apply what they learned in their law enforcement work.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE OR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: 1) ARCHS' GREAT Partnership (article). 2) ARCHS' GREAT Graduates 130 Students at Fairview (article). 3) ARCHS' GREAT Brings Families Together (article).

FAMILY JUSTICE CENTER OF ST. LOUIS

  • Funder: U.S. Department of Justice
  • Award Amount:  $600,000 (2006)
  • Topic: Community collaborative provided coordinated, centralized resources and services in a safe and accessible setting that promoted the healing of people who experienced violence in their relationships and/or families

Summary:

  • ARCHS partnered with 30 local entities to establish the St. Louis Family Justice Center, at the time only one of 16 in the nation.  The collaboration was unprecedented for St. Louis’ foremost family service agencies and public social services, law enforcement, and civil and criminal institutions.
  • This uniquely comprehensive approach eliminated the need for victims to endure painful retellings of their situations, find childcare and transportation to multiple service locations, and navigate a complicated process on their own.
  • The St. Louis FJC was designed to serve up to 2,000 domestic violence victims annually in its initial years, however in later years subsequent funding resources were dispersed to other local collaborative efforts.
  • The documented outcomes of the FJC collaborative model have included: reduced homicides; increased victim safety; increased autonomy and empowerment for victims; reduced fear and anxiety for victims and their children; reduced recantation and minimization by victims when wrapped in services and support; increased efficiency in collaborative services to victims among service providers; increased prosecution of offenders; and dramatically increased community support services to victims and their children.
  • The national FJC model has been identified as a best practice in the field of domestic violence intervention and prevention services by numerous local, state, and national organizations including the U.S. Department of Justice.  Past and current White House administrations supported the “one-stop” movement and expanded co-located, multi-agency services for survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and elder abuse both nationally and globally.

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ARCHS' Privately Funded Programming

ARCHS' HVN

Healthy Vision Network

  • Funders: Missouri Foundation for Health, Crown Vision Center, William Kemper Foundation
  • Award Amount: $334,785 (2006-2009)
  • Topic: Eye exams and glasses for uninsured or underinsured children and adults

Summary:

  • ARCHS' Healthy Vision Network (HVN) was a partnership with Crown Vision Centers, University of Missouri-St. Louis’ School of Optometry, Regional Lions Clubs, and area healthcare providers.  In 2008, ARCHS’ HVN completed a four-year educational effort that successfully provided free eye screenings and exams to 2,260 area adults.
  • Several cataract surgeries were also performed.  Later in 2008, ARCHS received a $7,500 donation from the William Kemper Foundation to support HVN for Kids. ARCHS again partnered with Crown to serve the vision needs of 175 kindergarten and first graders in six St. Louis Public Schools.

House Calls TV Program

  • Funder: Missouri Foundation for Health
  • Award Amount: $864,000 (2005 - 2007)
  • Topic: Health education program hosted by Dr. Valerie Walker for local PBS television affiliate

Summary:

  • ARCHS partnered with the Public Broadcasting System’s television affiliate, KETC-TV Channel 9, to produce and air a 13-week, half-hour health education program.  The House Calls program was broadcast by KETC in St. Louis, the most watched PBS station in the nation, and several PBS stations statewide in Missouri and portions of Illinois -- for a total viewing audience of more than 4.1 million.
  • House Calls focused on health promotion and resource awareness. The show featured information about PBS health-related web sites, and how to access the health clinics and health organizations identified in the various segments.  House Calls host Valerie Walker, MD, considered one of her target audiences the “hesitant insured”, minority populations often reluctant to seek timely or preventive health care.
  • As well, allied health professionals earned CEUs from viewing the 13 shows in the series.   In another extension of the health education and promotion of the program, St. Louis residents were invited to KETC/House Calls-sponsored health fairs serving as capstones to the TV series each season.  After this round of base funding, House Calls secured sustainable funding and newly broadcasted programming for this popular health show continues to educate the region’s residents.

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ARCHS' Health and Dental Care for Kids

  • Funder: United Way of Greater St. Louis
  • Award Amount: $35,000 (2009)
  • Topic: : Provide healthcare and social services to children and families

Summary:

  • Through a 2008-09 grant from the United Way of Greater St. Louis, ARCHS partnered with Health and Dental Care for Kids to fund a social worker position to support children and families seeking services at a midtown St. Louis clinic.  The clinic’s social worker served 24,849 children, with a focus on new immigrant families.
  • Health and Dental Care for Kids is an innovative joint effort led by BJC Healthcare and SSM Health Care. Due to the success of the partnership, the position is now funded on a permanent and full time basis with the Health and Dental Care for Kids.

America's Promise High School Drop Out Prevention Summits

  • Funder: America's Promise Alliance
  • Award Amount: $10,000 (2009 through St. Louis Mayor's Office)
  • Topic: Engage at risk high school students from the City of St. Louis in action strategies to graduate ready for college, work, and life.

Summary:

  • ARCHS partnered with key community leaders and youth-oriented media to convene three summits of a national research-based intervention to reduce dropout rates in St. Louis Public High Schools.  600 student participants contributed their ideas and perspectives related to the drop out crisis, giving everyone attending an opportunity to hear directly from them about the underlying causes and impacts.
  • The drop out issues were re-framed in the personal, daily experiences of students -- starting at home, going to school, spending the day in a classroom, spending after-school hours in the community, and returning home every single day.
  • Currently one out of two public school students drop out of school in the City of St. Louis.  Drop outs are more likely to be involved in crime, suffer from poor health, and live in poverty.Under the leadership of Founding Chairman General Colin Powell and current Chair Alma Powell, the America’s Promise Alliance has become the nation’s largest partnership providing supports to young people.

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ARCHS' Community Resource Directory

  • Funders: St. Louis Sustainable Neighborhoods Development Office, Ameren Missouri, Enterprise Rent-a-Car Foundation, Swift Print Communications, Community Asset Management Co.
  • Award Amount: $54,500 (2005-2007)
  • Topic: Computer-based community directory provided to St. Louis Metropolitan Police Dept. for use in patrol cars

Summary:

  • ARCHS partnered with the Public Policy Research Center of the University of Missouri-St. Louis to develop, launch, and update an online database of local community resource contacts for use in patrol cars by City of St. Louis police officers.
  • The computer-based Community Resource Directory had four core programmatic areas related to homeless, drug abuse, domestic violence, and youth services.  The United Way of Greater St. Louis was an active partner and later developed the 2-1-1 community resource system that replaced ARCHS’ Community Resource Directory.

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ARCHS' St. Louis Sustainable Neighborhoods

  • Funder: Danforth Foundation
  • Award Amount: $1.7 million (2002-2005)
  • Topic: Create community action plans for nine St. Louis City neighborhoods

Summary:

  • The Sustainable Neighborhoods Initiative was a partnership of residents, community groups, financial institutions, local foundations, and state and local government to revitalize nine St. Louis City neighborhood clusters.  As part of the Danforth Foundation’s legacy program St. Louis 2004, the Initiative was designed to “combine physical development and infrastructure improvements with human service support and community-based economic development”.  Each of neighborhood clusters developed a strategic plan.
  • “Despite the lofty goals of the Sustainable Neighborhoods Initiative, uneven development has characterized revitalization efforts in the target neighborhoods”, according to Dr. Scott Cummings of Saint Louis University in the critically acclaimed book distributed by the Missouri Historical Society Press, St. Louis Metromorphosis: Past Trends and Future Directions (2004).
  • St. Louis 2004 was a movement to make St. Louis a leading region in the 21st century, using the year 2004 as a deadline. Its mission was transform the St. Louis region into a great place in which people want to live and even to move. More than 1,200 volunteers input more than 100 ideas to achieve that goal.
  • Using the community's input as a guide, St. Louis 2004 developed 11 action plans: facing racism and discrimination, combating youth gang violence, safe places for kids, downtown revitalization, access to health, cleaner air, zero tolerance for hate crimes, 21st century technologies and high-paying jobs, sustainable neighborhoods, minority- and women-owned business growth, and regional park and trail systems.

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ARCHS' Sound Partners

  • Funder: Benton Foundation supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Double Helix Corporation
  • Award Amount: $52,000 (2004 -2006)
  • Topic: PSA's created by high school students regarding sexually transmitted diseases

Summary:

  • ARCHS and the Double Helix Corporation (KDHX-88.1 FM Radio) partnered with eight local grassroots organizations and several dozen students from St. Louis Visual & Performing Arts High School  and Webster University to implement the health literacy project Community Voice: STD Awareness to Action.
  • More than 20 television and radio public service announcements designed to appeal to vulnerable minority population audiences were produced.  More than 20 additional scripts were ready for production in order to continue the project at least one year after funding ended.  Participants reported an increase in understanding in the areas of sexual health, prevention, media, production, and social marketing.
  • In addition, the project promoted access to a website that linked to helpful resources, a database of topical health literacy information, and a lending library of professional grade audio-visual equipment.  According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control, St. Louis is making steady progress in reducing its STD infection rates, from the highest incidence rate among big cities at the turn of the 20th century.

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ARCHS' State of Missouri Funded Programming  

ARCHS' Early Childhood Accreditation Program

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services (1997-2012)
  • Topic: Improving the quality of child care and education programs that serve low income or special needs children

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with licensed child care providers in St. Louis City/County and St. Charles County who serve low income or special needs children, in order to increase the quality of their child care and education programs by supporting the accreditation or reaccreditation process.
  • From FY2008 to FY2012, ARCHS helped 21 percent (26) of all newly accredited programs in St. Louis City/County and St. Charles County to achieve that accreditation. Approximately one half of the children served by these newly accredited programs were identified as low income or special needs children.
  • The program was suspended due to State of Missouri budget cuts. No requests for proposals (RFPs) are planned.

ARCHS' Early Childhood Startup/Expansion Program

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services (1997-2012)
  • Topic: Supporting the opening or expansion of child care programs that serve low income or special needs children

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with licensed child care providers in St. Louis City/County and St. Charles County to support their opening or expanding licensed child care service sites, especially for low income or special needs children.
  • From FY2010 to FY2012, 16 licensed child care centers opened or expanded. 700 new early childhood care/education slots (birth to age three) were added and more than 75 percent of those slots were for low income or special needs children. 100 percent of the 16 centers created and updated their quality improvement plans, and implemented Strengthening Families plans for their programs.
  • The program was suspended due to State of Missouri budget cuts. No requests for proposals (RFPs) are planned.

ARCHS' SWIFT (Successful Work Incentives for TANF)

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Award Amount: $3 million (2007-2010)
  • Topic: Welfare to work job training and placement

Summary:

  • ARCHS’ Missouri Community Work Support Grant assisted adults participating in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) to remove sanctions through an innovative two-pronged approach focusing on “rapid response” engagement and “transitional job” training.  Service area is St. Louis City and County.
  • Over three years, ARCHS was credited with creating “promising best practices” in its approach for engaging sanctioned TANF participants.  ARCHS was asked to represent the State of Missouri in presenting its positive results at a federal Welfare Statistics Conference in 2009.
  • Documented reports show that of the 3,365 TANF participants eligible, 880 re-engaged with the Division of Workforce Development (DWD) for a 23% participation rate.  324 had their sanctions lifted by the Family Support Division (FSD). As well, performance measures indicate 494 were placed in “transitional jobs” training programs and 98 were placed in full time unsubsidized jobs.  More than 80 area employers were recruited to participate.

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Kids Hope United

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Award Amount: $137,500 per year (2006-2007)
  • Topic:  Stabilization services for youth in foster care

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with Kids Hope United that delivered intensive community-based services to identified youth judged to be “at risk” of foster care placement disruption.
  • The goal of the project was to significantly increase foster home stability among those at risk youth through the provision of assessment, case-management, counseling, and other supportive services.  The successful work is being continued through the region’s Foster & Adoptive Care Coalition.

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Family Support Network

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Award Amount: $112,500 per year (2008-2009)
  • Topic:  Prevention of child abuse reports leading to children being removed from the home

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with Family Support Network that assisted Project First Step, a voluntary in-home child welfare prevention service program.  Project First Step delivered home based interventions to reduce parental stress and other risk factors leading to child abuse and family disruption.
  • Home based services were provided for approximately one hour per week for an average of six to eight months until a family was stable and showed signs of functioning at a level sufficient to ensure a child’s safety.  The partnership served 400 individuals from 125 families with a 97% success rate on two of three key indicators.

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Award Amount:  $185,180 per year(2008-2009) and $7,475 per year (2009-2010)
  • Topic: Mentoring for children with incarcerated parents

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri that assisted Amachi, a national program that delivers one-to-one mentoring services for children who have at least one parent or immediate parent incarcerated in jail or prison.
  • The local program served 123 children during the fully-funded years, and in its final years provided comprehensive technical assistance support in training and professional development, policy development, and external auditing that included the following partners:
    • Cape Girardeau Missouri Mentoring Partnership
    • Phelps County Missouri Mentoring Partnership
    • St. Louis Work Site Missouri Mentoring Partnership

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Washington University in St. Louis Research Studies

  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Project Amount:$88,300 per year (2008-2011)
  • Topic:Program evaluation 

Summary:

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with Washington University in St. Louis to evaluate two separate programs being implemented by Family Resource Center.
  • The two programs are Parent Child Interaction Training (PCIT), serving 50 clients per year and Parenting Wisely (PW), serving 500 students per year.  Each of the two programs will deliver services for up to three years.

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  • Funder: Missouri Department of Social Services
  • Project Amount: $75,000 (3 years)
  • Topic: Evaluation

Summary: 

  • ARCHS provided oversight and strategic management for a partnership with Washington University in St. Louis to evaluate three separate programs being implemented by Family Support Network, Nurses for Newborns, and Independence School District Child Welfare Initiative (Kansas City).
  • The programs are helping to evaluate three leading child abuse and neglect prevention and intervention programs. The evaluations of these innovative programs will now be used to determine future "best practices" that can be replicated.

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