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2015 National KIDS COUNT® Data Book Released

About 1.7 million more children live in low-income working families today than during the Great Recession, according to the 2015 KIDS COUNT® Data Book from the Annie. E. Casey Foundation released on July 21.

In 2013, one in four children, 18.7 million, lived in a low-income working family in the United States. Nearly a third of children are living in families where no parent has full-time employment. And even when parents are working full time, wages and benefits are often not sufficient to adequately support a family.

View Missouri's 2015 State Profile

The 2015 Data Book, which focuses on key trends in child well-being in the post-recession years, measures child well-being in four domains: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community. The Casey Foundation report finds that the rising tide of recovery, with both increased employment and more concentrated wealth, has left stagnant pockets of low-income, struggling communities and families, where a child's future is anchored in scarcity and hardship.

Read more: 2015 National KIDS COUNT® Data Book Released

New KIDS COUNT® Report on Families

On any given night, about 57,000 children under the care of our nation’s child welfare systems are going to bed without the care and comfort of a family. In its May 19, 2015 KIDS COUNT® policy report, Every Kid Needs a Family: Giving Children in the Child Welfare System the Best Chance for Success, the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlights this and other sobering statistics that point to the urgent need to ensure, through sound policies and proven practices, that everything possible is being done to find loving, nurturing, and supported families to help raise more of these children. 

Specifically, Every Kid Needs a Family emphasizes making and keeping a lifelong connection to a family. The report also highlights the promising ways that state and local government leaders as well as policymakers, judges, and private providers can work together as they strive to help these 57,000 children who are living in group placements – and overall, the more than 400,000 children in the care of child welfare systems.

Read more: New KIDS COUNT® Report on Families

New KIDS COUNT® Report on Poverty

National SPM Report-3A report released February 25, 2015 by the Annie E. Casey Foundation shows that the federal government's official poverty measure created in the 1960s uses outdated information on how U.S. families are faring today, failing to illustrate the effect of programs designed to help them.

The new KIDS COUNT® Data Snapshot, Measuring Access to Opportunity, points to a better index for measuring the effectiveness of social programs designed to reduce poverty – the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM).

This measure has two rates; the first is designed to capture the effect of safety net programs (Social Security, food assistance, housing subsidies, etc.) and tax policies (EITC, etc.) on families. The second does not take into account these programs or policies.

By using the SPM, researchers have determined that the rate of children in poverty in Missouri is at 15 percent instead of 30 percent because of these programs and policies.

"It is great to know that these programs and policies are improving children's lives," said Wendell E. Kimbrough, chief executive officer of Area Resources for Community and Human Services (ARCHS). "The next step is to better maximize the success of these activities and interrupt future generational cycles of poverty. ARCHS' early childhood, after school, and adult job training programs are additional investments that are putting vulnerable children and their families on better pathways to opportunity."

Missouri SPM data highlights include:

  • According to the SPM (2011-2013) 218,000 Missouri children have been lifted out of poverty due to federal anti-poverty programs and initiatives (cash/non trash transfers).
  • According to the SPM (2011-2013), Missouri's poverty rate was 30% without cash/non-cash transfers (i.e., not taking into account federal anti-poverty programs and initiatives). The U.S. percentage of poverty without transfers was 33%.
  • According to the SPM (2011-2013), Missouri's poverty rate was 15% with cash/non-cash transfers (i.e., taking into account federal anti-poverty programs and initiatives). The U.S. percentage of poverty with transfers was 18%.

The Missouri Family and Community Trust (FACT), is the official Annie E. Casey (AECF) KIDS COUNT® partner in Missouri. FACT promotes and supports collaboration and innovation in service delivery for Missouri's children and families through its network of 20 "community partnerships" around the state. Area Resources for Community and Human Services (ARCHS) is the St. Louis region's state designated community partnership.

As St. Louis' KIDS COUNT® partner, ARCHS designs, manages, and evaluates 15 education and social service programs provided at more than 275 locations that annually improve the lives of more than 90,000 of the St. Louis region's most vulnerable children and their family members (FY2014 data).

Download PDF of National SPM Data Report

Download PDF of St. Louis SPM Data Report

Data

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The Missouri Family and Community Trust (FACT), is the official Annie E. Casey (AECF) KIDS COUNT® partner in Missouri. FACT promotes and supports collaboration and innovation in service delivery for Missouri’s children and families through its network of 20 “community partnerships” around the state. ARCHS is the St. Louis region’s state designated community partnership.

As St. Louis' KIDS COUNT® partner, ARCHS designs, manages, and evaluates 18 education and social service programs provided at more than 325 locations that annually improve the lives of more than 90,000 of the St. Louis region's most vulnerable children and their family members.

ARCHS values and promotes the sharing and dissemination of research and data to help support the work of St. Louis area organizations. ARCHS maintains this directory of resources to promote data driven decision making that both informs policy, and improves the service delivery of education and social service programs.

Please keep us informed of additional data sources or inactive links. View our local infographics on ARCHS' Pinterest board.

Special Reports:

State Data Resources:

Regional Data Resources:

National Data Resources: